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Repair Questions and Answers.

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 #389708  by LUNAT1C
 
Curious, since I'll be in the market for a 5 year belt job next summer, how do we know these OEM pumps aren't re-labeled V-line? I have a Carquest pump now and I'm planning to replace it regardless if I find residue or not, thankfully it served me well without missing a beat on the 2,000 miles SC trip through 7 states.
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 #389709  by M-Pressive
 
Part number is printed on them and it does not begin with a V. I would hope they are not re-labeled.

This particular part number was only released a few years ago and found by Steve Williams.
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 #389710  by In-trepid
 
Not all Mopar parts are created equal. This is from my new front strut bearings. It is in a Mopar box, purchased from a Mopar dealer. It is made in China. It leaves me just a bit concerned.
Image
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 #389711  by LUNAT1C
 
I'm not surprised to see OEM Mopar manufacturing shipped out to China at this point. Any idea where the new part number water pumps are made? Might still be a gamble if they're from China, but there's a possibility Mopar requires higher quality checks vs Gates.
 #389724  by TrepKing95
 
First Lady wrote: November 21st, 2021, 8:01 pm Took it for a drive tonight and it did pretty good temp wise. Might be one small air pocket so will bleed one more time tomorrow!
I just learned about "Air-Lift" vacuum bleeders for cooling systems... I bought it for a Diesel EGR Cooler job, but now it's my go-to for bleeding cooling systems. Literally vacuums out all the air in the system and replaces it with coolant.
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 #389727  by LUNAT1C
 
TrepKing95 wrote: November 23rd, 2021, 8:00 pm
First Lady wrote: November 21st, 2021, 8:01 pm Took it for a drive tonight and it did pretty good temp wise. Might be one small air pocket so will bleed one more time tomorrow!
I just learned about "Air-Lift" vacuum bleeders for cooling systems... I bought it for a Diesel EGR Cooler job, but now it's my go-to for bleeding cooling systems. Literally vacuums out all the air in the system and replaces it with coolant.
Doesn't sound too dissimilar (just opposite operation) from my Motive brake bleeder system. With an adapter for our master cylinder, it applies pressure to the brake system (with fluid in the Motive container). One at a time, I crack open the bleeder at the calipers just like any other fluid change procedure and the Motive pump vessel pushes out the old fluid, replacing it with fresh new fluid, no need to have someone pump the pedal while you open and close the bleeder repeatedly. Close it when the fluid runs clear and without bubbles and move the next. Longest part of doing a brake fluid change is putting the car in the air and removing the wheel and tire assemblies! Planning to get an adapter for the Jeep to replace its factory fill when the front brakes finally get bored and wear out (still plenty of meat at 82,000 miles despite years with 35s and now 33s) and I commit to a big brake upgrade.
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 #389730  by M-Pressive
 
Do you need a compressor to use one of those?
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 #389731  by M-Pressive
 
Temp seems to be OK, maybe running a bit warm.

I am hearing what sounds like gurgling/running water when I first start it and drive in the morning.

Any ideas other than an air pocket?
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 #389732  by Sneke_Eyez
 
Gurgling is *usually* air in the system, so that would be my guess, especially if it is running a bit hot.
 #389740  by TrepKing95
 
LUNAT1C wrote: November 24th, 2021, 2:45 am
Doesn't sound too dissimilar (just opposite operation) from my Motive brake bleeder system. With an adapter for our master cylinder, it applies pressure to the brake system (with fluid in the Motive container). One at a time, I crack open the bleeder at the calipers just like any other fluid change procedure and the Motive pump vessel pushes out the old fluid, replacing it with fresh new fluid, no need to have someone pump the pedal while you open and close the bleeder repeatedly. Close it when the fluid runs clear and without bubbles and move the next. Longest part of doing a brake fluid change is putting the car in the air and removing the wheel and tire assemblies! Planning to get an adapter for the Jeep to replace its factory fill when the front brakes finally get bored and wear out (still plenty of meat at 82,000 miles despite years with 35s and now 33s) and I commit to a big brake upgrade.
We have a nice machine for the brake flushes at work that has both a pressure bleeder and vacuum bleeder in the same machine. Keeps pressure on the master cylinder while you open each bleeder and suck out the old worn fluid. The hose that attaches to the bleeder is clear, making for some very satisfying "Before/After" viewing.
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 #389752  by LUNAT1C
 
TrepKing95 wrote: November 25th, 2021, 9:48 am We have a nice machine for the brake flushes at work that has both a pressure bleeder and vacuum bleeder in the same machine. Keeps pressure on the master cylinder while you open each bleeder and suck out the old worn fluid. The hose that attaches to the bleeder is clear, making for some very satisfying "Before/After" viewing.
Yep, cracking open the bleed and sitting back and watching that clear hose go from dirty to clean in seconds is very satisfying! I went and did the black car a few years ago after doing mine just because it was so easy.
 #389755  by user97
 
I had fairly good luck with Airtex/Autozone WPs — switched to them in late 2000s and they generally held up well. They do weep (pink crust build up) but no dramatic failures. Came with lifetime from AZ, so subsequent belt changes were no cost due to minor leak as evidenced by crusties. Not sure if they are still any good — last swap was circa 2016.