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Repair Questions and Answers.

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 #392389  by Stevelaz
 
Hello everyone. I have been smelling gas for a week or so from the vents when running heater/defog so i figured it was coming from the engine compartment. I pulled it in today to check it out and sure enough gas is spraying from a line from behind the motor, under the cowl, that goes what looks like down under car. its spraying near the quick connect and looks like it is a plastic line at that spot. Any idea of how i go about repairing this? Thanks... Attached are a couple pics, you can see the spray.
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 #392390  by LUNAT1C
 
That plastic line is a somewhat common leak point as the material gets brittle. Repair is to replace the plastic line. Do it now and do not drive the car until it's repaired, fuel has been known to spray onto hot components and combust, torching the car and anything it might be parked in/near.
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 #392391  by Stevelaz
 
Ok but how do i go about doing that? Here is the other end of that plastic hose that connects to a metal line that looks like it’s melted on.
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 #392395  by FIREM
 
That would be the fuel supply line from the tank to the fuel rail. 4581134AC
Appears to be made of Unobtainium like many parts for our cars these days.
I have not (yet) had to repair/replace this yet but here is what I would do.
Unclip the line from the fuel rail. First push the connector towards the rail then pinch the green "ears", gently twist and pull it off the rail.
Carefully cut the plastic line off the metal line coming from the tank, try not to scratch /gouge the metal line.
Carefully cut the plastic line off the clip fitting, again avoid scratch/gouge the fitting.
(Scratch/gouge could provide a leak path, scuff ends of tube and fitting with emery around circumference of the end)
Using the correct size (measure and match up) FUEL INJECTION HOSE and FUEL INJECTION HOSE CLAMPS replace the plastic line. Route the hose so it can not rub or touch other surfaces that may cut or chafe it.
(Maybe even zip tie or wrap with original plastic line to route the same way.)
Check for leaks.
Let us know how you make out.
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 #392396  by Stevelaz
 
Ok. Got it fixed and running, took some phone calls and a bit of researching.

First i found i was able to get a Dorman Quick Connect Nylon fuel line repair kit , part #800-060, that has the quick connect that connects to the metal fuel line off the engine , and about 14 inches of plastic/nylon hose line. The only thing is it is straight, so you have to figure out how to slightly bend it to make the fit to the other end of the fuel line. It also comes with a barbed union that you push into your new line and the old line. The only issue with this is its very very hard to push it into the hose ends. You are supposed to dip the ends in hot water to soften the nylon, but how the heck do you get boiling hot water to the end you left attached under the hood! Plus its very difficult to get your hands down there to be able to push them in.

I then found out that Dorman makes a shark bite type nylon fuel line union that pushes OVER the nylon hose and locks it on. They have different sizes, we need 5/16. These fittings got rave reviews! I got lucky and found both these parts at 2 different local parts stores.

What i did next was find a straight spot in the line facing upwards that i cut to attach the union. Then measure up to where you attach the quick connect and cut that line so it fit. I first attached the union to the quick connect out of the car so it would be easier. Its still tight but i read to apply a bit of grease to the ends to help them slide on easier. I then attached the other end to the line I cut under the hood and then attached the quick connect. Nervously i started the car and dam, gas was gushing from one end of the union. I was very disappointed but I checked the union and pushed the ends in tighter just in case they were not in all the way. Sure enough it worked! After starting the car again there was no leak whatsoever, not even a drip! I even reached in and wiggled hose by the union to make sure! I left everything apart and went out a few times to start it up to make sure all was good. Looks like it holding up well! Hope i explained it ok and attached are a couple picks. Thank to the guys who commented before!
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 #392397  by FIREM
 
Good deal, thanks for the write up on your repair.
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 #392398  by RobNJ
 
Nice job on repair! Never seen that barbed fitting before.
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 #392405  by adu1982
 
Nice job.....subscribed to this for the future luckily i got both cars with new lines just before they went out of production. But that was a couple of years ago.......and Florida is a hot oven sooo.....

Sent from my motorola one 5G ace using Tapatalk

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 #392408  by In-trepid
 
Personally, I'm not a fan of the barbed connectors. Could be that I'm just old school and look to fix things the way they were initially designed. While doing some research for a plumbing (water) job, I ran across these in plumbing supplies. Looking at the specs, they have a rated lifetime of 20 years at 150 pounds of pressure. Should be fine to use on fuel lines with only 55 pounds of pressure.
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 #392409  by Stevelaz
 
In-trepid wrote: December 6th, 2022, 1:58 pm Personally, I'm not a fan of the barbed connectors. Could be that I'm just old school and look to fix things the way they were initially designed. While doing some research for a plumbing (water) job, I ran across these in plumbing supplies. Looking at the specs, they have a rated lifetime of 20 years at 150 pounds of pressure. Should be fine to use on fuel lines with only 55 pounds of pressure.
Yes, I feel the same way. I would have rather put a hole new Chrysler line on it but unfortunately they are no longer available. Hopefully this will last a while!
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 #392410  by LUNAT1C
 
I was skeptical about the sharkbite type fittings as well, but after seeing several reviews from plumbers and home remodeling specialists describe them as great alternatives for DIY, I went ahead and used one to replace a leaky frost-proof silcock on my house right after I bought it (the most important one, services the front yard and driveway!). Going into our third Michigan winter, it hasn't leaked at all. The original was 27 years old and probably only needed a new interior gasket, but the assembly fell apart from rusty screws when I tried to repair it and had to end up cutting it out and replacing it.

All that to say... if it's not leaking when done and not leaking after several hot-cold cycles, it should be a good repair for some time. I also prefer the "as designed" repair approach, but sometimes it's not possible with available tools (I wasn't going to solder in close proximity to my rafters and sheathing) or parts.
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 #392414  by FIREM
 
2 comments from me.
I would feel better replacing as much of the plastic line in the engine compartment as possible. It has all been exposed to the heat, movement, and under hood environment. Regular inspections should prevent a problem but hate to have a leak on a long trip.

Push Lock/Barbed/ Shark Bite type fittings are a good alternative to "Mechanical" connections, WHEN PROPERLY INSTALLED. Taking them apart even with the proper tool can be a challenge. The sealing ring is actually only minimally exposed to what it is sealing. Clean ID and OD of the tubing, good square cuts, proper depth for locking and they will last. Time Tested Tough.
"Old School" mechanical connections rely on proper tightening, or soldering. without deforming anything rely on aptitude and technique that while many of us may have, some not so much........