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  • Yes some people clean their engine, some don't. You know who you are. :)
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Yes some people clean their engine, some don't. You know who you are. :)

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 #224609  by Bill Putney
 April 28th, 2010, 7:43 pm
jayman2 wrote:OK, I'm home now. I have one more question for you. Are you saying that I won't harm my engine by eliminating the oil cooler? If not, then what's the purpose of it anyway?
Apparently it was an engineering over-design. Then later cost cutting eliminated it (later year LH cars do not have the cooler). Also, MANY people including those who are considered experts by the LH community have eliminated the cooler with no ill effects. So both the factory and the real world laws of physics seem to agree that it is not really needed.
User avatar
 #224613  by jayman2
 April 28th, 2010, 7:54 pm
Bill Putney wrote:
jayman2 wrote:OK, I'm home now. I have one more question for you. Are you saying that I won't harm my engine by eliminating the oil cooler? If not, then what's the purpose of it anyway?
Apparently it was an engineering over-design. Then later cost cutting eliminated it (later year LH cars do not have the cooler). Also, MANY people including those who are considered experts by the LH community have eliminated the cooler with no ill effects. So both the factory and the real world laws of physics seem to agree that it is not really needed.
Thanks for the info. I will stop tomorrow and ask the mechanic to run it that way.
User avatar
 #224687  by Maximus
 April 29th, 2010, 5:19 pm
IMOP, I would keep the oil cooler. I beleive if you have an option to keep your oil temperature a little cooler....then why not use it. It can only benfit the engine not harm it.
IMOP
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 #224702  by jayman2
 April 29th, 2010, 7:22 pm
jayman2 wrote:
Bill Putney wrote:
jayman2 wrote:OK, I'm home now. I have one more question for you. Are you saying that I won't harm my engine by eliminating the oil cooler? If not, then what's the purpose of it anyway?
Apparently it was an engineering over-design. Then later cost cutting eliminated it (later year LH cars do not have the cooler). Also, MANY people including those who are considered experts by the LH community have eliminated the cooler with no ill effects. So both the factory and the real world laws of physics seem to agree that it is not really needed.
Thanks for the info. I will stop tomorrow and ask the mechanic to run it that way.
I stopped by Firestone on the way to work this morning and showed them a printout of eliminating the cooler. They admitted that it could be done, but it would cost a lot more money if THEY did it that way. They said that it would take more time and they would have to get extra things to plug up the radiator and oil pan, etc. They said that the labor alone would probably be around $300. The said that this would be the way to go if someone was doing the job their own self.

But I did get some good news this evening before I left work. Firestone called and told me that the part had just come in and my car would be ready tomorrow.

This really sets me back with the weeks car rental and the repair job. I could have used that money to have my 300M converted to dual exhaust.

But, it's gonna be great to have my ride back.
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 #224704  by Bill Putney
 April 29th, 2010, 8:13 pm
Fingers crossed, dude...
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 #224814  by jayman2
 April 30th, 2010, 8:35 pm
Daytrepper wrote:
Bill Putney wrote:Yeah - I don't know. It does sound a little fishy - but who knows? Maybe spray/clean that area off really well, and check it out after the engine runs a little bit - maybe you can see what's reallly going on. An inspection mirror on a stick (thinking of Gilbert Gottfried: "It's a shoe horn - on a STICK!!" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoGSsRppIXs) might help see what's up. Maybe you can get a digicam un in there and take some clear macro images right after cleaning it off and then after it runs some.
If that fitting is leaking, easiest and cheapest thing to do is to eliminate the oil cooler. Remove the sending unit from the fitting, the fitting from the block, and thread the sending unit into the hole where the t-fitting was. Remove the oil lines from the radiator and plug the return hole in the oil pan with a 3/8 npt pipe plug.

Its somewhat common for those t-fittings to leak, and they are always on back-order and ridiculously expensive. Around $150 last I checked. Make sure its not the sending unit leaking also, before condeming the t-fitting.
I got my car back today. The Feed Tube for the oil pressure release valve didn't come with it. The tube is still on backorder. So they went ahead and set it up as per the instructions as above as a temporary fix. The mechanic told me not to take any real long trips until they finished the job. The car had been there all week and it wasn't my fault the tube was missing. They're going to call me when it comes in and they'll repair it properly, at no cost to me naturally. They should have it in a couple of days.

In the morning I'm returning the rental, a chevy aveo. It's a 2010 and I think it's the worse car I've ever driven. My 300M looks and runs like new. It's great to have it back. I'm gonna post some pictures soon.

I also asked the mechanic if it's alright to have the underside spray cleaned at the car wash. He said that it was ok. I want to get some of that oil off the bottom.
User avatar
 #224845  by Maximus
 May 1st, 2010, 6:43 am
Don't worry too much about that oil underneath the car. It just provide a faster slipstream to cut through the air.. :what
User avatar
 #224854  by Bill Putney
 May 1st, 2010, 7:13 am
I'm glad Dan chimed in. I didn't know that that part is a common leaker. And also, if the cooler is eliminated, the oil pressure switch screws directly into the block (no thread adapter needed) - that simplifies things for a cooler delete.

I don't know what that oil pressure relief valve feed tube is or how it relates to what is being done, but it sounds like they know what they're doing.
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 #224855  by jayman2
 May 1st, 2010, 7:34 am
Bill Putney wrote:I'm glad Dan chimed in. I didn't know that that part is a common leaker. And also, if the cooler is eliminated, the oil pressure switch screws directly into the block (no thread adapter needed) - that simplifies things for a cooler delete.

I don't know what that oil pressure relief valve feed tube is or how it relates to what is being done, but it sounds like they know what they're doing.
I sure hope they know what they're doing. I have to take the car on the highway Monday and drive about 25 miles both ways, to and from work. I'm praying that the oil dosen't get too hot without that cooler setup. :lol:
 #382707  by J&C
 March 9th, 2020, 5:08 am
Is it ok to power wash the motors to clean them? If so should I do it with motor running or can is it ok to do it with it off?
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 #382708  by adu1982
 March 9th, 2020, 6:01 am
Don't know if I would call it power wash, but I've cleaned my cars engine with the water turned to Max on a hose with a spray nozzle , and all has been good but with the car turned off and then air blowed....

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

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 #382711  by M-Pressive
 March 9th, 2020, 7:21 am
I have done it many times with no issues. Usually with the car off.
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 #382716  by beespecial
 March 9th, 2020, 2:18 pm
I have never been comfortable with spraying my engine while it was running. It is not likely that it would suck in water but why chance it? Also, be very careful spraying electrical components with high pressure.
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 #382717  by First Lady
 March 9th, 2020, 3:58 pm
Have seen engine bays sprayed many times...I'd suggest maybe just start with a regular hose and see if it accomplished what you're looking to do. Work up from there and just be mindful about where you're spraying! Also be careful if you're using any cleaning chemical as water sprays everywhere!!
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 #382718  by LUNAT1C
 March 9th, 2020, 4:05 pm
Be careful not to get water into the air filter, or into any electrical connectors. Hose pressure might be fine, but a pressure washer would force the water into the electrical contacts and accelerate corrosion. I typically avoid the filter, alternator, PCM, coils, and other connectors when I pressure wash my engines, and use a long bristle brush with degreaser or APC to agitate the rest and hose off.