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  • Yes some people clean their engine, some don't. You know who you are. :)
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Yes some people clean their engine, some don't. You know who you are. :)

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 #152455  by neuroticdave
 
Ive been looking at this for a bit now. Ive read success stories about them, and a rare horror story. Im basically looking for a GOOD product to have the dealership add to my engine during its next oil change that can clean up the inside of the engine. At 107,000+/- miles Im pretty sure its getting gunky in there, and I would like the car to last me as much as possible.

Ive also given thought about the fuel additives. Ive seen a few at AutoZone which you supposedly add to a full tank, and it will clean up a lot of things as you use the car.

Then theres the BG services. Ive seen the commercials time and time again, but Im not sure if Im convinced. I imagine all they do is basically what adding additives myself would. But of course, I am more than likely wrong. I provided a link down below for people who dont know what that is.

So what do you guys think, any products I should use specifically?

http://www.bgfindashop.com/bgservices/transmission.htm

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 #152456  by Bill Putney
 
Good gasoline additive/injector cleaner: Techron, Marvel Mystery Oil, Sea Foam.

Crankcase cleaner: If you're using synthetic, you don't need any added crankcase cleaner. If using non-synthetic, use Marvel Mystery Oil or Sea Foam. I keep 8 ozs. of MMO in the crankcase at all times (with Castrol GTX mixed 10W-30 and 20W-50 because the MMO is thinner) on all my cars. It was particularly important on my 2.7L engine because they are known for sludging up and failing at 60 to 80 k miles - mine now has 190k miles on it and still running strong.

I recommend against any "sudden flush" methods, because if you truly do have a lot of residue, too much stuff could be released in a very short period of time and overwhelm the bearings and filter. Go with gradual, controlled cleanout. Always change the filter with *every* oil change at the start of the process (I change filter with every oil change anyway).

The above are my opinions. Other people have differing no-less-valid opinions, and hardly any two people agree 100% on these things.

 #152459  by JTROANOKE
 
My last car, a 1995 Mercury Grand Marquis never had an oil additive in 160k. When I sold it, it was as quiet as the day I drove it off the lot (new). I had a valve cover off shortly before I sold it to replace a leaky gasket, and the inside was extremely clean. This was on a diet of mostly dino oil, with a move to synthetic blend in its later years. IMHO, if oil is changed regularly, no additives to oil are necessary. Come to think of it, I never added any gasoline or transmission additives either. IF you cruise the postings at www.flatratetech.com, a forum staffed by automotive technicians, they refer to essentially all chemicals as "wallet flushes" as they have very little use in their opinion, other than a feel good for the owner and more money for the dealer.

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 #152469  by FIREM
 
Use good quality, proper specification fluids and change at regular intervals and you will be just fine. Flushing agents at high mileages can do more harm than good. As Bill noted, "sudden flush" methods can break away deposits and overwhelm filters and bearings. I tell my students " If fix in a can works, make sure you buy FOR SALE signs with your purchase" Past vehicles in the family fleet have gone up to 250k without incident, no additives. Dave PM me, we live close enough, maybe we could get together and give your M the once over.

 #152472  by Shadowvox6
 
Seafoam does well in the gas tank, crankcase, and through the throttle body to clean.

I use Lucas Fuel Injector cleaner twice a year in the cars.

Other than that, just drive it, maintain it well, and it will return the favor.

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 #152473  by BMac
 
http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/ . Here is a good site to find out anything oil, additive, fuel,etc related.

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 #152500  by Bill Putney
 
JTROANOKE wrote:My last car, a 1995 Mercury Grand Marquis never had an oil additive in 160k. When I sold it, it was as quiet as the day I drove it off the lot (new). I had a valve cover off shortly before I sold it to replace a leaky gasket, and the inside was extremely clean. This was on a diet of mostly dino oil, with a move to synthetic blend in its later years. IMHO, if oil is changed regularly, no additives to oil are necessary. Come to think of it, I never added any gasoline or transmission additives either. IF you cruise the postings at www.flatratetech.com, a forum staffed by automotive technicians, they refer to essentially all chemicals as "wallet flushes" as they have very little use in their opinion, other than a feel good for the owner and more money for the dealer.
My reply is: If you're not injured, you'd be a fool to put a tourniquet on your arm or leg as a preventative. But if you're going to die without one, then you'd better make one and quick.

As an owner of the 2.7L engine - known for sludging up and dieing between 60,000 and 80,000 miles, I figured I needed a toruniquet. The fact that I'm still running well at 190k miles (and so's my car) tells me that MMO does no harm. And it suggests that some additives may be advisable under some conditions (lots of stop-and-go, short trip driving for example). Truth is, I put it in all my cars. Used MMO in my '86 turbo'd Subaru wagon, and sold it with 275k miles on it and running then, with orignal engine and original turbo unit, as well as it did off the showroom floor (the buyer had to scrap it 6 months later because the frame had rusted and it no longer would pass inspection).

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 #152511  by velobard
 
Dave, you should spend some time reading over at the BITOG forums if you're interested in this sort of stuff.

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 #152659  by Arved
 
Image

The names have changed, and the FDA has forced a slight change in tactics, but the scam is the same. Promise anything in order to convince a fool to part with his money.

The advice to read BITOG (Bob is the oil guy) forum is a good one. There, you will see a lot of references to a product called Auto-RX. I think the worst that can be said of the product is that it does no harm. Many swear by it, and have the numbers from oil analysis to back up the claims.

The best thing, though, is to not abuse your car in the first place. There's a reason it's called regularly scheduled maintenance, and not when I think about it maintenance or when I'm paranoid I might have a problem maintenance. If you perform regularly scheduled oil and filter changes, there's no reason to think you may have a problem.

As Bill pointed out with his Subaru experience, modern engines maintained with modern oils will, generally, outlast the rest of the car. IMHO, you're far more likely to suffer transmission or suspension problems than problems with your engine if you properly maintain the engine.

Warmest regards,
 #306797  by RidgeRunner
 
Has anyone tried the gasoline additives regarding ethanol?
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 #306806  by hrmwrm
 
only additives i have used that work.
forget brand, but a lifter/valve cleaner. took away a bad ticking lifter in a minute, and stp, since my short trips in my truck have a tendency to fill my crankcase slowly with gas, diluting and causing a gain in oil in as little as a few weeks.
if i drove it for a good long run at least once a week, i wouldn't have the problem, but since i don't, i do.
others that have a purpose are some good injector cleaners, that might cure a rough idle if caused by dirty injectors. but you'd probably try only after plugs and a throttle body cleaning haven't changed it.
many are absolutely uneccesary unless you have an actual problem to solve, as opposed to a problem you think you have.
i've pulled covers off engines with unreal miles that were still relatively clean inside, and low milers that look like the oil has never been changed.
if you've taken care with proper oil changes, there should be no need for additives,
unless you're trying to fix a problem with less invasive measures first, then i wouldn't bother with additives. save your money for the next oil change.
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 #306817  by InfernoLime
 
I feel comfortable putting additives (I like sea foam) in almost any car's FUEL TANK, as quality gasoline (meaning any major brand) has cleaners in it, so the fuel system should never be AWFUL, plus you will be able to tell based on if the car is having fuel starvation issues. But even as a avid seafoam enthusiast, my dad has a BMW 325i from 1992 with almost 400,000km and we will not put anything in the intake or crankcase from fear of loosening sludge and carbon that is not doing any harm (other than performance) right now. He is planning on a full engine rebuilt soon.