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Yes some people clean their engine, some don't. You know who you are. :)

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User avatar
 #203285  by IAJack
 
I am wondering if it is OK to use those auto car washes with the underside sprayer as you enter?

On my used ride it looks like at one time a hose blew or something spewed oil all over the left front underside and frame. I have it pretty cleaned up from just a regular wash but the frame and cross member has some oil and residue left on the underside. Anytime I get out of the car I detect a slight oil burning smell. I have left cardboard underneath and detect zero leaks, it runs fine and nor errors and I have checked the wheel bearings. I am thinking the mess that got spewed all over is just getting warn when running and that is what I smell?

I am thinking of spraying it heavily with degreaser and then running through the auto wash to see if that helps?
(BTW this would be the "NO touch" auto wash too)
User avatar
 #203286  by 300maximilien
 
I use those types of washes all the time in Winter to get the salt off. I try to make sure my car isn't very hot when I go. Not that is matters, but I feel better not spraying a hot engine or rotors with cold water.

That oil might be from an oil change. Someone not used to the car may have dumped the oil filter which is in that area and will run down the front cradle
User avatar
 #203300  by Bill Putney
 
Also, be aware that it is hard to pour oil into the 3.5 crankcase (like when topping off or during an oil change) without spilling due to the fill hole being below other nearby things - especially with the larger oil containers (4 and 5 qt.) that they sell now. Any that does get spilled *WILL* end up on the exhaust immediately below the fill hole - and not on the exahust pipe, but on a heat shield surrounding the exhaust pipe - so the oil will get hot enough to smell a lot, but won't burn off rapidly - it may take a couple of days of normal driving for the smell to stop - only a few drops is enough to smell a lot.

My guess is that the oil that you mentioned on the left side frame member happened from the filter change as Craig suggested, but that that is not what is getting hot/burned and smelling - just a theory on my part.

Also - the oil pressure switch is in the area of the filter (on the left side). Those switches are known to start leaking oil - so what you're seeing there could be from the filter change *or* leaking pressure switch right next to Mr. Filter.
User avatar
 #203378  by Timbo
 
No problem at all with using them. You should have seen when Bob (FIREM) powerwashed my engine two weeks ago before we began work. As Bob said and I quote "You can't hurt nothin"
User avatar
 #203381  by YardleyBill
 
Timbo wrote:No problem at all with using them. You should have seen when Bob (FIREM) powerwashed my engine two weeks ago before we began work. As Bob said and I quote "You can't hurt nothin"
I can contest it looked quite nice.

I thought all the cables in our engines were black. Didn't realize some were actually other colors.
User avatar
 #204445  by LUNAT1C
 
I'm a firm believer in washing my car myself and not using automatic car washes, however in the winter I find it very necessary to use them for the underbody wash to get the salt off. When I bought my 2001 ES in 2004, the underbody was immaculate, and I kept it that way. The underbody of my 2002 Special isn't as nice, due to it being a PA car, but I intend to keep the existing "sorta-rusty" areas looking their best. So far it's just the standard surface rust on joints and welds -- not something to worry about at all. It's the transverse muffler that concerns me, but it should be good to go for another few winters before needing replacement.
User avatar
 #204467  by grayslater
 
Never had any problems using them. I too usually only use them in the winter to remove salt and usually above 32 degrees F.
User avatar
 #204587  by Bill Putney
 
FWIW (and admittedly, possbily not much) the street rumor used to be that many car washes simply filter and re-use water to save on their own water bills. IOW - in areas where salt is used on the roads in winter, there would likely be a high concentration of salt in the water being used to rinse your car off. Could be a total myth. Does anyone know if there is any truth to it today?
User avatar
 #204594  by 300M_Brat
 
Bill Putney wrote:FWIW (and admittedly, possibly not much) the street rumor used to be that many car washes simply filter and re-use water to save on their own water bills. IOW - in areas where salt is used on the roads in winter, there would likely be a high concentration of salt in the water being used to rinse your car off. Could be a total myth. Does anyone know if there is any truth to it today?
I have worked on several car wash site plans (past career as a civil engineer) and in my area of Florida it is a requirement that most (I think around 75%) of the water is to be recycled and contained for reuse. They do use filters and the water is purified to an extent, but you are correct in that most of today's car washes used recycled water. Does the salt hurt? IMO Probably not... In most cases it may help to soften the water. Any salt stones should be filtered out, and with the sizes of jets most debris wouldn't even pass thru.
User avatar
 #224431  by jayman2
 
Bill Putney wrote:Also, be aware that it is hard to pour oil into the 3.5 crankcase (like when topping off or during an oil change) without spilling due to the fill hole being below other nearby things - especially with the larger oil containers (4 and 5 qt.) that they sell now. Any that does get spilled *WILL* end up on the exhaust immediately below the fill hole - and not on the exahust pipe, but on a heat shield surrounding the exhaust pipe - so the oil will get hot enough to smell a lot, but won't burn off rapidly - it may take a couple of days of normal driving for the smell to stop - only a few drops is enough to smell a lot.

My guess is that the oil that you mentioned on the left side frame member happened from the filter change as Craig suggested, but that that is not what is getting hot/burned and smelling - just a theory on my part.

Also - the oil pressure switch is in the area of the filter (on the left side). Those switches are known to start leaking oil - so what you're seeing there could be from the filter change *or* leaking pressure switch right next to Mr. Filter.
What is that part that the oil pressure switch screws into called? I had my pressure switch replaced this past January, now that piece coming from the block that the pressure switch screws into has a hole in it. The dealer says that the part is on national backorder and it will be over a week before he can get it. Now I'm driving a rental to work and it's killing my wallet.
User avatar
 #224442  by Bill Putney
 
jayman2 wrote:What is that part that the oil pressure switch screws into called? I had my pressure switch replaced this past January, now that piece coming from the block that the pressure switch screws into has a hole in it. The dealer says that the part is on national backorder and it will be over a week before he can get it. Now I'm driving a rental to work and it's killing my wallet.
If I read right, the FSM calls it the oil cooler adapter fitting, and the parts pdf's call it the 'VALVE PACKAGE, Oil Cooler Pressure Control, Includes Valve and Quick Connect' - P/N 5014313AA. I wonder if it's a different part on cars without the oil cooler - IOW - just adapts the pressure switch w/o the stuff not needed if your car does not have a cooler. There is a different P/N for earlier years: 4792285 - but that is likely to be for the cooler and the other P/N is for without, and they didn't change the description on the later part without the cooler?

If your car doesn't have a cooler, I have to wonder if you just need a standard thread adapter. I don't know if it screws into the oil pump or the engine block - but if your car is sans cooler, if you find out the two threads involved, you likely could find a generic adapter.

Darren (MAVMAN72) or Dan (DayTrepper) - any help on this info.? Either an alternate OEM part, *OR* what the two thread spec. are?
User avatar
 #224504  by jayman2
 
Bill Putney wrote:
jayman2 wrote:What is that part that the oil pressure switch screws into called? I had my pressure switch replaced this past January, now that piece coming from the block that the pressure switch screws into has a hole in it. The dealer says that the part is on national backorder and it will be over a week before he can get it. Now I'm driving a rental to work and it's killing my wallet.
If I read right, the FSM calls it the oil cooler adapter fitting, and the parts pdf's call it the 'VALVE PACKAGE, Oil Cooler Pressure Control, Includes Valve and Quick Connect' - P/N 5014313AA. I wonder if it's a different part on cars without the oil cooler - IOW - just adapts the pressure switch w/o the stuff not needed if your car does not have a cooler. There is a different P/N for earlier years: 4792285 - but that is likely to be for the cooler and the other P/N is for without, and they didn't change the description on the later part without the cooler?

If your car doesn't have a cooler, I have to wonder if you just need a standard thread adapter. I don't know if it screws into the oil pump or the engine block - but if your car is sans cooler, if you find out the two threads involved, you likely could find a generic adapter.

Darren (MAVMAN72) or Dan (DayTrepper) - any help on this info.? Either an alternate OEM part, *OR* what the two thread spec. are?
Thanks for your reply. The mechanic showed me where my fitting goes right into the engine block and it has a little metal tube coming from the side that broke free and is just hanging.

Is this a hard part to find? Would you recommend searching the junk yards? The Chrysler parts dept. said it would be at least a week before the part was in stock, but no real ETA. I would like to get my car back on the road as soon as possible. I'm driving an Enterprise rental and it's really costing me. Any suggestions?
User avatar
 #224512  by Bill Putney
 
I don't recall ever reading of another failure of that part - probably safe to get it from a salvage yard. So yours is leaking?
User avatar
 #224514  by jayman2
 
Bill Putney wrote:I don't recall ever reading of another failure of that part - probably safe to get it from a salvage yard. So yours is leaking?
I had my oil pressure switch replaced this past January. Last Saturday I was having my oil changed and the mechanic told me he wanted to show me something. He took me down into the pit and showed me the pressure switch and told me that it was leaking oil when my car started. He said that whoever put it in, probably put it in wrong. After I left there, I went back to Firestone, who did the oil pressure switch job and told them about the problem. They said they would check it out. After a while they came into the waiting room and took me into the bay area and showed me under my car, a small, visible hole on the side of the unit that connects to the engine block and the small tube was now hanging free. They told me that it was old and corroded and it was a good thing that I brought it them when I did.

Here's what I'm thinking. I've had my car for about 3 years and never had any leaks. After I had Firestone replace my oil pressure switch, I started noticing small spots in my driveway where I park. I didn't think too much of it. I just figured it was because the car was getting older. I wonder if it WAS the oil pressure switch and maybe Firestone, intentionally damaged my connector valve to escape responsibility. I mean, how did it get so bad all of a sudden just driving a few blocks from the oil change center to the Firestone shop? I'm going to stop by there on my way to work this morning and tell them that I want that old part. Then I'm going to examine it.

What do you think?
User avatar
 #224526  by Bill Putney
 
Yeah - I don't know. It does sound a little fishy - but who knows? Maybe spray/clean that area off really well, and check it out after the engine runs a little bit - maybe you can see what's reallly going on. An inspection mirror on a stick (thinking of Gilbert Gottfried: "It's a shoe horn - on a STICK!!" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoGSsRppIXs) might help see what's up. Maybe you can get a digicam un in there and take some clear macro images right after cleaning it off and then after it runs some.
User avatar
 #224552  by Daytrepper
 
Bill Putney wrote:Yeah - I don't know. It does sound a little fishy - but who knows? Maybe spray/clean that area off really well, and check it out after the engine runs a little bit - maybe you can see what's reallly going on. An inspection mirror on a stick (thinking of Gilbert Gottfried: "It's a shoe horn - on a STICK!!" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoGSsRppIXs) might help see what's up. Maybe you can get a digicam un in there and take some clear macro images right after cleaning it off and then after it runs some.
If that fitting is leaking, easiest and cheapest thing to do is to eliminate the oil cooler. Remove the sending unit from the fitting, the fitting from the block, and thread the sending unit into the hole where the t-fitting was. Remove the oil lines from the radiator and plug the return hole in the oil pan with a 3/8 npt pipe plug.

Its somewhat common for those t-fittings to leak, and they are always on back-order and ridiculously expensive. Around $150 last I checked. Make sure its not the sending unit leaking also, before condeming the t-fitting.
User avatar
 #224556  by jayman2
 
Daytrepper wrote:
Bill Putney wrote:Yeah - I don't know. It does sound a little fishy - but who knows? Maybe spray/clean that area off really well, and check it out after the engine runs a little bit - maybe you can see what's reallly going on. An inspection mirror on a stick (thinking of Gilbert Gottfried: "It's a shoe horn - on a STICK!!" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoGSsRppIXs) might help see what's up. Maybe you can get a digicam un in there and take some clear macro images right after cleaning it off and then after it runs some.
If that fitting is leaking, easiest and cheapest thing to do is to eliminate the oil cooler. Remove the sending unit from the fitting, the fitting from the block, and thread the sending unit into the hole where the t-fitting was. Remove the oil lines from the radiator and plug the return hole in the oil pan with a 3/8 npt pipe plug.

Its somewhat common for those t-fittings to leak, and they are always on back-order and ridiculously expensive. Around $150 last I checked. Make sure its not the sending unit leaking also, before condeming the t-fitting.
Thanks for the suggestion. I'm at work right now, but I'm going to print this out tonight when I get home. Tommorow morning before I go to work, I'm going to take it to Firestone and see if they'll look into it and see if they're willing to do this for me. I'm a long time customer, so I hope they'll work with me.

Thanks again, everybody. I'll post back the results.
User avatar
 #224563  by Maximus
 
I just changed out my radiator and I have the oil cooler. Let me tell you that you will never get the fittings off of the radiator side. They are frozen on there. I used the right tool for the job with an extension bar and could not move it. I had to cut my line right befor the fitting. After I removed the rad I actually applied heat to the fitting before I could turn it out with a socket.

So good luck if you go that route.
User avatar
 #224566  by FIREM
 
Spray the underside down with Simple Green or other oil killer spray cleaner, drag the lawn sprinkler under the car to rinse it.......
(giving away cleaning tips) :lol:
User avatar
 #224602  by jayman2
 
jayman2 wrote:
Daytrepper wrote:
Bill Putney wrote:Yeah - I don't know. It does sound a little fishy - but who knows? Maybe spray/clean that area off really well, and check it out after the engine runs a little bit - maybe you can see what's reallly going on. An inspection mirror on a stick (thinking of Gilbert Gottfried: "It's a shoe horn - on a STICK!!" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoGSsRppIXs) might help see what's up. Maybe you can get a digicam un in there and take some clear macro images right after cleaning it off and then after it runs some.
If that fitting is leaking, easiest and cheapest thing to do is to eliminate the oil cooler. Remove the sending unit from the fitting, the fitting from the block, and thread the sending unit into the hole where the t-fitting was. Remove the oil lines from the radiator and plug the return hole in the oil pan with a 3/8 npt pipe plug.

Its somewhat common for those t-fittings to leak, and they are always on back-order and ridiculously expensive. Around $150 last I checked. Make sure its not the sending unit leaking also, before condeming the t-fitting.
Thanks for the suggestion. I'm at work right now, but I'm going to print this out tonight when I get home. Tommorow morning before I go to work, I'm going to take it to Firestone and see if they'll look into it and see if they're willing to do this for me. I'm a long time customer, so I hope they'll work with me.

Thanks again, everybody. I'll post back the results.
OK, I'm home now. I have one more question for you. Are you saying that I won't harm my engine by eliminating the oil cooler? If not, then what's the purpose of it anyway?