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  • Get your T-25 torx wrench and come on in!
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Get your T-25 torx wrench and come on in!

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 #204102  by sashsania
 
Well... bought 6 NGK 7781s, got T-25 torx.

Opened first 2 bolts, no problems at all, felt very confident, went to next and they just don't move. Tried few others but no luck. So out of 12 I am able to unscrew only 2 :( Didn't want to be too rigid and brake the bolts so postponed my project.

Please share your ideas how to loosen them up a bit and unscrew properly.

Thanks.
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 #204103  by 300maximilien
 
Try using a Torx bit in a ratchet. And pre treat with some


Image
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 #204105  by rogor2k
 
Try putting some Liquid Wrench (or equivalent) around the Torx screw heads and letting it soak in for a while.

Then, take your Torx wrench, put the tip into the screw head, and lightly tap it to seat it firmly into the screw head socket. Dirt and gunk gets into the head over time and doesn't allow you to seat the wrench head completely. This will cut through the gunk and allow you to get a good seat in the screw.

Then, loosen very carefully, maintaining as much downward pressure as possible on the top of the wrench. Has always worked for me. Good luck!
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 #204108  by YardleyBill
 
I used a drill with the bit inserted.
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 #204116  by Bill Putney
 
sashsania wrote:...Didn't want to be too rigid and brake the bolts so postponed my project...
That was smart.

Along with the other good suggestions, also tap the head of the screws solidly with a hammer (not hard enough to do damage, but good and solid) before and after applying the Liquid WrenchÔäó/PB BlasterÔäó. The shock can help break the corrosive bonds between the threads, and may help the penetrating oil weep into the interstices. (Also - WD-40 is not a penetrating oil - good for some things but really sucks at that - some people don't know that so thought I'd mention it.)
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 #204121  by grayslater
 
YardleyBill wrote:I used a drill with the bit inserted.
+1
Yup, I've been using the drill method for removing these now for years. It has plenty of torque and if you have a good bit, should be no problem. I also set the torque on my drill when I tighten them back up too.
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 #204136  by YardleyBill
 
If your drill has torque type settings, start with the lowest and move on up.
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 #204138  by 300M_Brat
 
Yep.... What everyone else said, and as Cory said, be very sure to have a good bit. Not one that came in a kit with a $5 screw driver. I had one screw on mine that just would not budge and ended up stripping out. I then just used a Dremel with a cut off wheel and sliced a large flat head grove in the head of the screw to get it out.
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 #204141  by Bill Putney
 
I've posted before about "Torx-Plus" screws and bits. Apparently the torx features of the Torx-Plus heads and bits are made to tighter tolerances and closer fit than generic torx stuff. From the McMaster Carr catalog (about torx bits):
"Exclusively for use with Torx-Plus screws, these keys and drivers deliver up to 100% longer life and 25% better torsional strength than standard Torx tools. They also have less cam-out (slippage that can damage the screw)."

The way I figure it, you'd gain half of that using torx-plus bits with generic torx screws (or vice-versa). Not expecting anyone to order them (I haven't) - just food for thought.

Ahh - but alas - this from the wikipedia article on "Torx":
"A TORX variant, TORX PLUS, is designed to allow greater torque, and to minimize wear. Currently, TORX PLUS heads and drivers are patented, slowing adoption in the marketplace, but is licenced to a number of tool manufacturers [1] including Camcar [2] and Facom [3]. The specifications for these licences are held by Textron. Standard TORX drivers can be used to drive TORX PLUS screws, but not to full torque because of the loose fit. TORX PLUS drivers will not fit standard TORX screws. They are shortened to 'Torx TS'."
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 #204200  by sashsania
 
Thanks everyone. I'll try the suggestion over the weekend and let know how it goes.

On the same note, also tried to replace the PCV valve. Found it located so much back in the engine bay near the windshield that I can hardly reach to it. And on the top of it, the hose connecting to valve is so tight I am finding it near impossible to push it out with hands and then use a wrench or something to unscrew and get the old valve out.

Was wondering is it supposed to be so complicated, or do I need to take out black panel near windshield to change it?

Please suggest how you folks are doing it.
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 #204214  by 300maximilien
 
Not sure if you are aware, but there is a whole section of How-to's in the Paid Memebers area. It's a small investment of $15 and allows you access to some great maintenance and Modification info. These funds are also used to support our main website and this Forum.

Here is the link on how to join if you are interested.
http://300mclub.org/v3join.html
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 #204223  by grayslater
 
sashsania wrote:On the same note, also tried to replace the PCV valve. Found it located so much back in the engine bay near the windshield that I can hardly reach to it. And on the top of it, the hose connecting to valve is so tight I am finding it near impossible to push it out with hands and then use a wrench or something to unscrew and get the old valve out.

Was wondering is it supposed to be so complicated, or do I need to take out black panel near windshield to change it?
The PCV valve can be removed without any additional parts removed but it is a bit more tedious. Like an 1/8 of a turn at a time with an open ended 3/4" (19mm) wrench (IIRC). Then you can remove the hose from the opposite end and take it to a work bench and pry it off of the barbed end of the PCV valve.

If you want more access, then yes, you would have to remove the wipers, cowl screen, and front strut brace.

Best of luck.
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 #204249  by Bill Putney
 
sashsania wrote:...And on the top of it, the hose connecting to valve is so tight I am finding it near impossible to push it out with hands and then use a wrench or something to unscrew and get the old valve out...
Cory's suggestion of turning the PCV valve out with the hose still on it works. But I will add that the fact that you can't get the hose off very easily means that it has become hard and brittle from age and heat. When you put it back on the new valve, it won't seal well, and may split.

Replace the hose - have dealer order it ahead of time. They aren't that expensive, or at least didn't used to be. If you insist on re-using the old hard one, one day you will go to take it off and it will split - then you've got to improvise (with tape or whaterver) until you can get a new one from the dealer.
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 #355003  by mnitetrain
 
http://www.sears.com/hanson-7-piece-pow ... ckType=G17

I have a smaller set of Craftsmen nut busters, it grabs the head without drilling/no debris. Walks these out like no one's business. Just replace screws.