Chrysler 300M Enthusiasts Club
  • Intake advice needed (K&N FIPK/Mini-Breather Filters)

  • Getting More Air? A Hot Mod. Discuss here.
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Getting More Air? A Hot Mod. Discuss here.

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 #288608  by Grandma'sBoy
 
Before I begin, let it be known that I am not very automotive savvy. I have very limited experience working with cars and I am amazed I was able to install the intake. (even though it was pretty easy) This is my first post here at the 300mclub, I have read a lot of useful information here, you guys are very knowledgeable.

Just put in a K&N FIPK last weekend on my recently inherited 03' 300M Base (THANKS GRANDMA!)

My question is regarding the short hose that connects the intake to the throttle body? The position of the connector's makes the hose crimp in the middle cutting off airflow. I bought a new hose, a little longer, and it still crimps due to the braided material. I think I need a heat resistant silicone hose, I am unsure of the diameter needed though.

So what I ended up doing was slapping on 2 small breather filters on each inlet. I was told that this would actually give me better/more airflow and thus better performance than just using the hose, is this true?

Ultimately my question is, is it better to have breather filters on each inlet or to use a connecting hose? What is the difference?

I will be posting some pictures of what I currently have installed, any/all opinions would be appreciate.
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 #288612  by davidlb512
 
The small breather you have coming off of the valve cover is fine, but I would just close off the opening on the intake tube, rather than having that filter you have on it. All that is doing is interrupting the direct passage of air flow coming from your main filter. Basically it's creating turbulence at the halfway point of the intake pipe, and cutting down on the direct air flow to your throttle body. Hence cutting down on possible horsepower.
 #288617  by Grandma'sBoy
 
Yeah I was just looking at your thread as well speed! I knew I had seen that video before! I was trying to find it last weekend when I did the install.

Thanks for the information David, that's extremely helpful and informative. Thinking about it, yeah it does make perfect sense.

In hindsight, I don't think I should have bought the breather's at all. So I get what you are saying, but do you think having the one breather on the valve cover and capping the inlet on the intake is preferable to just running a hose between the two?
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 #288620  by davidlb512
 
Grandma'sBoy wrote:Yeah I was just looking at your thread as well speed! I knew I had seen that video before! I was trying to find it last weekend when I did the install.

Thanks for the information David, that's extremely helpful and informative. Thinking about it, yeah it does make perfect sense.

In hindsight, I don't think I should have bought the breather's at all. So I get what you are saying, but do you think having the one breather on the valve cover and capping the inlet on the intake is preferable to just running a hose between the two?
Your welcome! Always willing to lend a hand(info), when able to.

I would say that you should cap the opening on the intake tube, and have the breather on the opening of the valve cover. Or you could just find a hose that will work in place of the original hose. Either of those 2 options would be better than having a breather on both openings.
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 #288632  by Bill Putney
 
I don't have any opinions one way or t'other, but borrowing a little old school from coolant systems, lower radiator hoses often came with a loose-fitting metal spring inside to prevent the hose from collapsing (from the suction). If you *were* wanting to put a simple hose connnecting the valve cover to the intake tube, you could find a long metal compression spring in the hardware store small enough in diameter to fit loosely inside the hose so that the hose would stay completely open (i.e., not kink) even if forced into a curve. If you have a choice, go with a spring that is fairly flimsy (i.e., small wire) so it doesn't try to force the hose to be straight.