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Yes some people clean their engine, some don't. You know who you are. :)

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 #306452  by Bigsplash
 
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Engine has developed a bit of valve lash ticking, so with that in mind I decided to try my luck with a little upper combustion chamber de-carbonizing, maybe its my lucky day and it fixes the ticking.

I applied the whole can of Mopar's Upper Combustion Chamber Conditioning as per instruction, but instead of spraying it into the throttlebody I disconnected the brake vacuum line and sprayed the chemicals in that way.

After letting it soak for a couple of hours (on the can it said 3-4 hours) I revved the engine gently between 1000-3000 RPM and then took the old girl out for a spin.

Well the tick is still there, can't really tell if the engine runs any smoother, but the thing that stumps me, there was no smoke coming from the exhaust. I have seen the seafoam videos on YouTube and was fully expecting to see my car turn in to a smoke machine.

Did I screw something up? Anyone else use this stuff and not have any smoke coming from the exhaust?
 #306453  by Null
 
I also did the seafoam. Put 1/3 in the oil, 1/3 in the gas tank and 1/3 in the vacuum line ran the engine till it stalled. Let it sit for an hour then came back started up the car and there was absolutely no smoke...... Followed with an oil change. But no smoke.
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 #306454  by Bigsplash
 
The no smoke thing is bizarre, was concerned that maybe spraying into brake vacuum connection wasn't such a good idea. Maybe all the chemical pooled into one are of the plenum waiting for the right moment to hydro lock the motor.

Do I really need to change the oil after doing this? :eek


If it ain't broke, break it, then fix it <--------- :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
 #306455  by Null
 
i did because i mixed the seafoam in with the oil as the directions said. I think you should ask someone more experienced than me though. Im assuming you will have to.
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 #306457  by Strmvt
 
If you read the can you can either change the oil or leave it in until you your next I'll change so either way your fine.

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 #306460  by paintballdude05
 
Usually the engine will smoke if there's a lot of carbon build-up. If you drive with a really light foot and never get on it then you will have carbon issues. Also, your tick is probably some wear in the top end. If it bugs you go grab some Lucas oil stuff, that will probably quiet it down some. If it still bothers you, new rocker assemblies are about $500 for the pair from the right source.
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 #306472  by InfernoLime
 
+1 for seafoam. I put a 1/3 in the brake booster but only let it sit for about 10 minutes then drive it.

And like null26 said, if you put it in the crankcase, change your oil after a 50 mile run max.
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 #306474  by Strmvt
 
mattgendron wrote:+1 for seafoam. I put a 1/3 in the brake booster but only let it sit for about 10 minutes then drive it.

And like null26 said, if you put it in the crankcase, change your oil after a 50 mile run max.
Read the can you CAN LEAVE it in until your next oil change

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 #306475  by InfernoLime
 
Strmvt wrote:
mattgendron wrote:+1 for seafoam. I put a 1/3 in the brake booster but only let it sit for about 10 minutes then drive it.

And like null26 said, if you put it in the crankcase, change your oil after a 50 mile run max.
Read the can you CAN LEAVE it in until your next oil change

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Yes but from I understand you shouldn't as it can loosen carbon or sludge (the goal of it), but if you run with that now loose sludge for too long it can clog the filter and possibly do more harm overall than when it was stuck to the crankcase wall or something.
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 #306483  by Bill Putney
 
Using the brake vacuum hose, since it is ported to the extreme driver's side of the plenum, the passenger bank cylinders likely saw very little of the fluid. There is a small elbow in the top of the plenum just ahead of the throttle body - that is probably the best port to use (even distribution among the cylinders).
 #306484  by Null
 
mattgendron wrote:
Strmvt wrote:
mattgendron wrote:+1 for seafoam. I put a 1/3 in the brake booster but only let it sit for about 10 minutes then drive it.

And like null26 said, if you put it in the crankcase, change your oil after a 50 mile run max.
Read the can you CAN LEAVE it in until your next oil change

Sent from my HTC DNA using Tapatalk 2
Yes but from I understand you shouldn't as it can loosen carbon or sludge (the goal of it), but if you run with that now loose sludge for too long it can clog the filter and possibly do more harm overall than when it was stuck to the crankcase wall or something.
I personally wouldn't leave it past 100km before doing an oil change. Then again we can see the results of not changing your oil if you leave it, so in the end the forum could benefit from this information :D
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 #306485  by Bigsplash
 
Bill, any reason you see why I didn't see any smoke?
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 #306488  by InfernoLime
 
Bigsplash wrote:Bill, any reason you see why I didn't see any smoke?
I didn't have that much either. The smoke is mostly the carbon burning off, and somewhat the seafoam. If the car is well maintained you will not have a crazy smoke show. Someone may correct me, but how I see it, running high rpms may not be the best for the engine long term, but the heat can help prevent carbon build up. I mean shifting around 3500 and pulling 6000 a few times a week for fun :P
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 #306494  by Bill Putney
 
Bigsplash wrote:Bill, any reason you see why I didn't see any smoke?
I'm thinking the same as Stephan and Matt on that: Smoke is the carbon burning off. Not much carbon? Not much smoke.

FWIW, I seafoamed my 2.7 right after replacing the valve stem seals (along with timing chain/water pump/oil pump job). It had been burning oil/smoking for 1-1/2 to 2 years (30k-40k miles) before that due to obviously bad valve stem seals. I couldn't even turn the engine over by hand due to piston/carbon/cylinder head interference caused by the amount of carbon which had swelled up from the carbon absorbing moisture from the damp compressed air used during the valve stem seal replacement process. I eliminated the interference by putting measured amounts of Sea Foam in each cylinder (it really does soften and dissolve the carbon!). The first thing I did after getting the engine running was a thorough Sea Foam treatment (followed by another oil and filter change). As you might guess, there was a bit of smoke. (I've never Sea Foamed my 3.2.)
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 #306523  by Mottman
 
I have used Seafoam a few times ( once recently on The EVIL Sickness, and a few other cars in the past ) And I always get a good deal of smoke. I think Bill is right. You should use the vacume port just in front of the throttle body for equal distribution to all of the cylinders. useing the other connection will only clean one side/bank. I have found the real way to use Seafoam is ( 1 ) first: manually clean the throttle-body with gum-cutter, the Seafoam WONT clean the front of the throttle-body,butterfly ( it cant get to it ) best to actually do this off the car ( too much gum-cutter or Seafoam for that matter WILL trash you'r sparkplugs very quickly ! ( 2 ) Next; after you have the throttle-body all cleaned up and reassembled on the car, Start the engine and bring it to operating temp. then shut it off and remove the vacume line and install a funnel on the vacume port just in front of the throttle-body. ( the one Bill is talking about ). ( 3 ) Start the car and SLOWELYpour in the Seafoam. DO NOT REV THE ENGINE ! Just DRIZZEL the Seafoam in nice and slow AT IDLE ! If you are doing it right, the engine will idle a little rough and seem to be missfiring as you are pouring it in. If the engine seems like it is going to stall, dont rev the throttle ! just slow down or stop pouring in the Seafoam untill the engine recovers. You will get into a rythem of drizzeling in a little Seafoam and backing off before the engine stalls. Go through this process with a whole 16oz can. ( 4 ) Once you are all done and the Seafoam is all gone, remove the funnel, reinstall the vacume line , and let the engine idle for about 2 miniutes, and no more. And then shut off the engine. ( 5 ) Let the engine sit for 5 - 10 miniutes AND NO MORE ! Now start it up and get ready to scare you'r neigbors with a huge white smoke-screen ! Waiting any longer than 10 miniutes and the Seafoam winds up evaporating, leaving all the now gooey black sludge/carbon buildup removed from the intake ports and combustion chambers to solidify in the exhaust manifolds. Maybe causing more harm than good in the future ! You actually want the Seafoam to carry all this trash to the catylitic converters. The cats get gummed up, get real hot, and burn up all this crap ! That is what the white smoke actually is. No white smoke, carbon buildup has not been burned away. Hope this helps.
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 #306530  by Adpros
 
IIRC, the MOPAR combustion cleaner is supposed to be shot directly into the throttle body. Not for the effect of cleaning the throttle plates but for a large concentration of product to pool in the combustion chamber. The way I understand it is that you should be applying the maximum amount possible, (Just short of killing the engine), and when the can is almost empty, the engine can either die or be shut off so that a liquid sample of the product can work on the deposits in the valve and piston area.

Just letting it draw into the booster hose won't get a high concentration of the cleaner into the area where it's needed most. (Just burns off like regular fuel).

You need to be aggressive with this stuff and make your engine "Choke" it down rather than let it sip.
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 #306544  by Bill Putney
 
...just don't hyrdolock it. :wink:
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 #306778  by Adpros
 
Bill Putney wrote:...just don't hyrdolock it. :wink:
Point taken Bill. I'm not sure you can do that at the rate the "Mopar" stuff comes out of the can. Perhaps some of the others on the market might have the ability to overdose the induction system, I don't know.

I did see one time where a tech did that but, it was a 2.0L or 2.4L stratus 4 banger. The reason it happened was due to the way the intake plenum swept downward from the intake ports on the head. I think the plenum had pooled a lot of the stuff in the bottom and it wasn't until after the car had been sitting for the recommended time. IIRC, he idled it out of his bay and as soon as he hit the thottle to leave the parking lot... BOOM!

Dis-assembly was cool! I think at least three rods had bent.
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 #306781  by Bill Putney
 
You can definitely hydrolock it with Sea Foam as it's just an open can and you put plastic tubing in - restricted only by the diameter of the tube itself unless squeezed down or kinked.
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 #306816  by InfernoLime
 
Bill Putney wrote:You can definitely hydrolock it with Sea Foam as it's just an open can and you put plastic tubing in - restricted only by the diameter of the tube itself unless squeezed down or kinked.
+1. When I did mine, I had a friend hold it at 2000rpm, and had it 'idle rough' as I put it in and made sure I did not put too much.