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  • Yes some people clean their engine, some don't. You know who you are. :)
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Yes some people clean their engine, some don't. You know who you are. :)

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 #328265  by MarvinM
 
Well it can't all be BS. I read a lot people on line posts that they had failed the state inspection sticker test but, passed after just sea foaming the car. Must be something to it. Plus a lot of people here on the forum seem to do it often as normal maintenance. I'll let you all know how the car performs after. Like I said I hope it cures my long cranks.
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 #328269  by Chrysler1924
 
Manny, I could be totally off-base here, but have you verified that you don't have a pressure leak somewhere in the fuel line? I'm thinking that if perhaps the fuel rail loses pressure either due to a leak or fault condition with the pump module, you *might* experience longer cranks. Also I've heard that failing crank/cam sensors can also cause that same issue. While you're at it... I'd clean your idle air control valve too... it can only help with the car's idle and Seafoam won't clean that.
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 #328304  by InfernoLime
 
To me, it's "might as well" maintenance. The only word of warning is if the car is very old and had the potential for a lot of carbon build up. The seafoam could looses large chucks and cause more problems than it solves. My dad had a BMW with 420,000 Kms on it with original engine and we didn't want to risk it.
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 #328327  by Mottman
 
Matgendron, Cant blame you there. Seafoam can trash sparkplugs if you fog it in the
intake on engines with alot of carbon. Odd note, before I fogged my engine. One of the
sparkplugs on The EVIL Sickness went bad all of a sudden. One moment it was running
fine the next shake and missfire like a cement mixer full of golfballs. I honestly thought
she broke a piston or swallowed a valve. it was that bad and that sudden. This is when I
found out she still had the original sparkplugs. And they were all pretty much shot
( center electrodes almost completely gone ). And they were alotta fun getting out too.
So I had to get 2 sets of plugs. One for right then to get the engine running somewhat
normal. and another set for after the Seafoam a few weeks later.
 #328339  by MarvinM
 
Chrysler1924 wrote:Manny, I could be totally off-base here, but have you verified that you don't have a pressure leak somewhere in the fuel line? I'm thinking that if perhaps the fuel rail loses pressure either due to a leak or fault condition with the pump module, you *might* experience longer cranks. Also I've heard that failing crank/cam sensors can also cause that same issue. While you're at it... I'd clean your idle air control valve too... it can only help with the car's idle and Seafoam won't clean that.
I read all the stuff on long crank starts the following thread (cam sensors, fuel filters, fuel pump fail, blah blah)

http://300mclub.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=27033

Staring with the cheapest and easiest solution and going to work my way up the list. It might be the fuel pump, I hope not but, going to try everything before I need to do a tank drop.
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 #328356  by TrueBlue
 
mattgendron wrote:The only word of warning is if the car is very old and had the potential for a lot of carbon build up. The seafoam could looses large chucks and cause more problems than it solves.
Oddly enough, I've never tried uploading a pic directly to the site so now's my chance. Here's a 40+ year old car getting Seafoam down the carb. The trick, if I remember correctly, was to get it so it was balancing on the edge of stalling - still inhaling the liquid, but not killing the engine. I did it in spurts, too, to avoid hydrolocking the engine.

The storm system this created killed mosquitoes for six states and one province.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
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 #328363  by Mottman
 
Ok so wheres the really heavy smoke ? That nice little Mustang musta
been running really clean. Although GONE IN 60 SECONDS is corny,
I have to admit ELANORE is georgeous.

The EVIL Sickness
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 #328424  by TrueBlue
 
I think this picture was taken while the car was still visible, heh. Trust me, this was an impressive cloud when it was done. I'm sure some of the grass never grew back.

Anyway, back to the OP, as you're adding the Seafoam, just listen to the car's idle, it'll tell you what she is feeling. It starts getting a bit rough, back right off.
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 #328425  by FIREM
 
A number of years ago someone "Seafoamed" their car in the hotel parking lot at tha Carlisle meet. It smoked so bad the fire alarm in the building next door went off. Good news was that the car was out on a "road test" when the PD anf FD showed up. We had some explaining to do for sure.
Not being a Seafoam user or believer help me understand something. If the magic is that it "cleans" the intake valves/combustion chamber why then do you need to repalce the plugs? Should not they also be "cleaned" :?
I just have a problem with the potential of hydrolock/bent rods/damaged pistons/ring land damage etc when pouring liquid with a "calibrated" eye/ear into a running engine :roll:
While I understand the "need to clean" I have fabricated an injector flush rig and plan to run MotorVac thru the Pro- Am to see if it does anything measurable. Daily commute documented as base line in process, then will see what if anything happens.
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 #328443  by InfernoLime
 
I honestly never believed or heard anyone who needed to replace the spark plugs after seafoam. I have been seafoaming probably every 4 months for 2.5 years and no plug issues. Some people may do it, but the can doesn't say to or anything.

Ultimate from what I understand, it is a petroleum product that helps to liquify carbon to remove deposits that are then burned off or so small particles they blow out of the engine with the exhaust.
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 #328536  by miska_man
 
Plugs do not have to be changed after Seafoaming. I asked a Seafoam rep this and he had confirmed no need to change plugs.
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 #328573  by Mottman
 
Not always, thats true. But I have seen otherwise on a few occasions.
Get a little too agressive and its possible to mess em up. I would still
recommend having a set ready just in case.
Individuall results may vary.

The EVIL Sickness
 #328785  by MarvinM
 
Update. Did a leak down test and failed. As soon as I turned the key to on the pump primed but the PSI started to drop like a rock. Then After starting and running the car the PSI dropped fast as soon as I turned it off. So I had to pull out the big guns:
Image
This seemed to of worked. Leak down test passed. Looks like it was a leaky injector but, I went out to start up the 300m after sitting for 5 hours and felt a bit of a delay on the crank. I will see how it reacts tomorrow afternoon after sitting all night and morning. I think it just might be my paranoia that makes it seem like the crank was long. Just to be sure I might connect the gauge again tomorrow to double check.
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 #329115  by gabe18
 
Seafoaming as I type :D
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 #361808  by ThaJuggla817
 
Bill Putney wrote: ... You may want to spray clean the throttle body and also remove and clean out the IAC motor and the cavity for it in the throttle body if you are having idle problems...

Hey, Bill, I was wanting to bounce something off you since I see your knowledge across multiple forums and your wisdom is great. But I was considering going to the yard and finding a secondary throttle body, cleaning it up nice and pretty and using that one and alternate between the two as needed in terms of maintenance and cleaning. The second thing that I was wondering is what exactly would I need to clean up the IAC without causing it any damage. I noticed that those are hefty in price for replacement. I was figuring a stiff tooth brush and whatever cleaner, but that's why I'm asking first before I pursue it.
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 #361819  by beespecial
 
ThaJuggla817 wrote:
Bill Putney wrote: ... You may want to spray clean the throttle body and also remove and clean out the IAC motor and the cavity for it in the throttle body if you are having idle problems...

Hey, Bill, I was wanting to bounce something off you since I see your knowledge across multiple forums and your wisdom is great. But I was considering going to the yard and finding a secondary throttle body, cleaning it up nice and pretty and using that one and alternate between the two as needed in terms of maintenance and cleaning. The second thing that I was wondering is what exactly would I need to clean up the IAC without causing it any damage. I noticed that those are hefty in price for replacement. I was figuring a stiff tooth brush and whatever cleaner, but that's why I'm asking first before I pursue it.
You may be waiting quite a while for a response from Bill. He doesn't frequent our forums much at all anymore. He's a very knowledgeable person and I for one, miss him around here but he's moved on. If you see that he's in other forums, it would be best to query him in those places.
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 #361821  by ThaJuggla817
 
Lol, so I forgot to check the date/time stamps on posts. Lol. Then anyone else since Bill is MIA?
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 #361860  by tafi300M
 
I would use spray solvent, not the tuffest, water and compressed air. Maybe soft brush lightly.
 #363804  by noahjoseph05
 
-My name is Jon. I purchaced a 2007 Chrysler 300 with 100k miles on it. It has the 2.7 Liter V6,but suprizeingly it had been taken good care of. One thing i did notice was a real iritateing Valve Tap,but Chryslers are notorious for this,the Car still ran great. After doing some research i heard that repair shops have a service they do on high milage cars to clean/flush out gum/carbon deposit build up to free up sticky valves and solving the valve tap issue. They call it a Three Stage and charge somewhere in the neighborhood of 300-350$. I am now and forever a Beleiver in Seafoam Brother! This is what i did: I started the car,went under the hood and removed the oil cap. I then poured a third of a court of ATF into the crank case and waited about a minute,next i slowly started to pour in a half a can of Seafoam directly into the crank case. Once i was done pouring in the Seafoam i shut the car off and poured about 3 shot glasses worth of Seafoam into the crank case,put the cap on and fired the car back up allowing it to idle for 10 minutes. I then draind all the old oil ou and discarded the oil philter. (this part is important)with the oil draind and the oil filter off,i started the car for several seconds and turned off(i could here more oil draining) i started the car one more time for several seconds and turned it off only to hear more oil drain out. Now i knew every drop was out(dont worry,you have to do this to be successful just use comon sence) Next i wiped everything up and installed new oil filter,and 5 and a half quarts of Mobile1 Full Synthetic. Next i poured half a can of Seafoam in my fuel tank,removed my break booster vacume line and sucked up just under half a can of Seafom,turned car off and let sit for 15 minutes. Next i took her out and ran her full throttle take offs about 6 or 8 times,drove her back into the garage and let her sit til morning. When i came out the next day and started her up i couldnt beleive my ears...it worked...the car sounds like it was just bought! You can totally here how the sticky valves got freed up,the car is so quiet now and has way better responce. I am proud of myself! Hope this helps you out
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 #363976  by InfernoLime
 
^^thats a pretty aggressive treatment! Glad it worked! I've never heard of putting ATF in the crankcase before? Where did you hear that?