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Post about dealer experiences

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 #93503  by dclabs
 
The dealership around here is really good. The main one is actually quite polite and very honest when it comes to repairs. There have been many times that my mom has brought the minivan into the shop to remedy a problem, and they've called her up and said "yup, checked it out, things look alright, you shouldn't need to fix that for a bit yet" and sent it home without charging a thing. I like how they've treated me as well, from sale to service.

It's about time they do something right!

 #103131  by Avenger
 
sdmike300m wrote:A woman I work with was looking at Lexus' about 6 months ago and was really getting the run around because 1) she's a woman, 2) she's young, and 3) she dresses comfortably (sandals, jeans). After dealing with (CENSORED) for about 30 minutes she left...and paid cash for a Boxster right down the street.
Porsche > Lexus ;)

I tried to test drive a Dakota R/T.....and when I came back from the test drive I saw my first Intrepid R/T.....asked to test drive that one. Salesman told me I didn't want an Intrepid, I'd be happier with the Dakota. Took the Intrepid R/T out and fell in love. 2 years later, I owned one :) I bet the salesman didn't think I'd pay cash outright for the car being 21 at the time.

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 #103153  by roger
 
tinman wrote:My wife goes for oil changes at the same shop all the time. They always give her a list of things that are "absolutely necessary" to repair. One included brake pads. After I told her twice in a row after her oil changes that her pads were okay she still insisted she needed new pads. I told her okay, I would change them, not those butt holes. When I pulled the pads off they had over half the pad left! The turkeys didn't even pull pad to make their recommendation, they just told her she needed pads to sell more. Finally she got my message that they are bad people to deal with. She still has them change her oil, but ignores their "warnings" for the other items.
Last time my wife went for an oil change, the guy came up with a whole list of things that needed to be done. She just reached into her per purse, took out her cell phone, dialed my number, handed the phone to the guy and said: "Here, explain to my husband what needs to be done." Immediately, he lowered the seriousness of all these things from "absolutely necessary" to "might want to keep an eye on...". I didn't even have to say anything. Amazing, isn't it?

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 #103156  by EasyRider300M
 
well--I find that it's best to go into a dealer or a local mechanic wearing my club jacket. He usually will ask about the logo. I tell him we're a club with 1200 members including mechanics, service writers, and savvy 300M enthusiasts who are always willing to help club members with diagnosing problems. I think they'd think twice about giving me the runaround. :behind

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 #103165  by velobard
 
tinman wrote:My wife goes for oil changes at the same shop all the time. They always give her a list of things that are "absolutely necessary" to repair. One included brake pads. After I told her twice in a row after her oil changes that her pads were okay she still insisted she needed new pads. I told her okay, I would change them, not those butt holes. When I pulled the pads off they had over half the pad left!
I took my old Ford conversion van in a few years ago to get some front end work done. When I went to pick it up, the price was $150 over the estimate and along the way they mentioned they'd decided to install new front brake pads. I'd had $70 ceramic pads on there because the van was notoriously bad about going through front brakes and the pads were less then half worn. They slapped on cheap $10 semi-metallics that dusted on the alloy wheels like crazy. I challenged them on it asking where my ceramic pads were, and they turned a little red and insisted that were just trying to do me a favor and at least they hadn't charged me for that part of the work. Yeah, right.

 #103575  by 300Michael
 
You mention age, I would go to the dealers (parts department mostly) and take my younger cousin (he is 23) The dealership guys would gather around the car to ask about it, He would explain the little he knows. When I walk out they are surprised. to see someone twice his age owns the car. Or you get the line "Are you the owner?????" Like only people under 30 do things to their cars. I do agree for women it is even worse, as there are not too many woman into cars, but I slowly see that changing for the better.

 #104989  by mopar_guy
 
Naturally the younger generation attracts a series of disrespect at the dealership. Dealerships are money hungry, and pursue this money thirst by selecting "applicable" candidates.

When I bought my Carrera Turbo S, I walked into the dealership in my casuals, and was ignored for 45 minutes. After growing impatient I approached a sales man and asked for a manager. After a look of disdain he left and returned with a middle aged women. She, impolitely, asked what it was I needed. I responded by saying I had a certified check for $200k and wanted a Turbo S, producing the check for her to see. Suddenly I was a customer! Except I didn't stand for ignorant behavior, and after 30 mins of begging, pleading and price dropping, I got my car, a cover, a set of winter tires/rims and knocked $25,000 of the price. It's sad I had to produce money before this happened.

Dealerships need to realize that the real money isn't in the people who are 50+ with money, but in the 18-20s that are looking to buy their first new car. A company that goes out of it's way to appeal the youth will have their sales for the rest of their life. Selling one 20K car doesn't make as much as locking in $100K of sales in a lifetime.

Oh, and I'm not a youngster, at 39, I'm no youth.

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 #104991  by velobard
 
This isn't about cars, but I used to know a guy who sold mobile homes. One time on a cold, rainy day a couple weeks before Christmas (slowest time of the year) the sales guys were sitting inside playing cards when a rusty old pickup pulled up and an old guy in worn coveralls pulled up. They drew straws to see who would have to go out and deal with him. Turns out the guy had just sold his farm and he bought 2 new double-wides for cash, one for him and one for his daughter. The salesperson who waited on that old guy wound up being able to afford to taking off the rest of the month.

I had a friend who's grandma had quite a bit of money. Once when she moved she needed a new broker, so she dressed in her gardening clothes and went into an office with a small check, like around $500, that she wanted to invest. They treated her well, so she came back the next day dressed to the nine's with her entire portfolio.